Rural

SUCCESS STORY: FROM WASTE TO GOLD

The Inspiring Story of How Maligaon Gram Panchayat, Kushmandi, in Dakshin Dinajpur Embraced Solid Waste Management for a Pollution-Free Environment

111Maligaon Gram Panchayat, under the Kushmandi Panchayat Samiti of Dakshin Dinajpur district, is home to 6,321 families. Agriculture is the main livelihood of the inhabitants of Maligaon. The total population of 26,172 people of the area is divided into 17 Gram Samsads. All of them actively participate in the developmental efforts. During the primary stage of the planning process, in the primary and secondary phase of data collection and analysis, the Gram Panchayat decided to implement a project of perishable and nonperishable solid waste management. They felt that such a project would help them in maintaining the general health of the area and will also act as a means of revenue generation.

Accordingly, the Gram Panchayat decided to implement the project in its general meeting. Subsequently, in the financial year 2016-17, the Gram Panchayat began its perishable and nonperishable solid waste management program under the aegis of the District administration, 222ISGPP and Block administration. The said project was constructed at an expenditure of Rs.25,18,256/- . The entire amount was funded by the State Government under its Mission Nirmal Bangla (Swachh Bharat Rural Mission) in the financial year 2016-17.

Using mobile vans, Gram Panchayat employees go from door to door to collect the wastes. The wastes are then taken to the Bio-fertilizer Production Centre of this project. Here, bio-fertilizers are made from the perishable solid waste. The nonperishable solid wastes are recycled. The Gram Panchayat has supplied all the necessary equipment like vats, buckets, trolleys, dress etc. for proper implementation of this waste management project. The elected representatives and employees of Maligaon Gram Panchayat and the people of the area regularly inspect the management practices of this project.  The participation of the inhabitants in the participatory Gram Panchayat planning stage and in the analysis of the collected data was commendable. These collective efforts have resulted in the successful and proper implementation of the project. Maligaon Gram Panchayat is responsibly working towards its promise of proper maintenance of this project. Moreover, the Gram Panchayat is earning revenue and increasing its own funds by selling the bio-fertilizers produced from the perishable solid waste.

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Success Story: From Darkness to Light

The Khalore Gram Panchayat (GP) under Bagnan-1 Block of Howrah district, is a densely populated area. The place is also known for the Bagnan railway station, one of the busiest railway stations in the South Eastern Railway Zone. Lakhs of people commute via this busy railway station daily. Although, the day-time situation of this area has been okay, it used to become difficult after dusk. People have been facing extreme difficulty in travelling from one place to another late at night as there was no street-light at the station as well as its adjacent areas. Local people had a long-standing demand for street-light.

Blog_1_Jul-14Localites had strongly demanded for the installation of street-lights during the 2014-15 Gram Sansad Sabha but the plan could not be materialised owing to lack of fund. In 2015-16 Institutional Strengthening of Gram Panchayats Project (ISGPP) arranged for a special fund that enabled the GP to materialise their planning. Before this, Khalore GP had taken the initiative to install solar street-lights in some areas, but it failed to provide any suitable solution to the problem in hand as these lights were too few in number.

The GP had earlier decided to install LED lights on roads, but owing to certain changes in Government policy, the West Bengal Renewable Energy Development Agency was not installing street-lights in the locality at that time. The GP then decided to appeal to West Bengal State Blog_2_Jul-14Electricity Transmission Company Ltd., seeking their help to install lights on the electric poles. They received the necessary assistance soon after. It was decided that the cost of illuminating these street-lights will be borne out of the GP fund in some cases. In certain other areas, the GP appealed to the Panchayat Samity for financial assistance. Panchayat Samity finally agreed to the appeal after thoroughly evaluating the nature and gravity of the problem. In short, everybody stepped forward for solving the problem in question.

The scheme was drafted in November after doing several rounds in various areas and evaluating the market price of various materials required for the project. Tenders were invited in the month of December and work commenced by mid-January. Although issues pertaining to the delivery of products from WBSETCL posed some logistic challenges that deferred the entire process but in spite of this, installation of 94 nos. of LED street-lights was completed by mid-June. To finish this two-phase work of installation, an amount of Rs. 4,92,642/- and Rs. 5,12,911/- was spent respectively, adding up to a total of Rs. 10,05,563/-, out of a special grant of ISGPP for 2015-16. Additionally, the GP spent an amount of Rs. 35,895/- to increase the load capacity of the transformers as well as to install new meter boxes, which was not considered in the original cost estimation.

Street-lights have been installed extensively at every Gram Sansad under Khalore GP. 30,000 – 40,000 people, residing at Khalore and its adjacent areas, have been benefitted by this initiative. Everyone is pleased with this noble initiative by the local GP. The women, especially, are very happy as they no longer need to worry while stepping out at night. People all around are thanking their GP & ISGPP wholeheartedly.

Low Cost Bridge: A Unique Initiative

Sarishakhola Gram Panchayat near Ghatal in Keshpur block is flood prone by its sheer nature. During monsoon residents of this area remain scared of being swept away by the deluge. There are several ponds, puddles and natural canals lining this Gram Panchayat area. On one side these numerous water-bodies act as reservoirs for holding the extra runoff from the flood water while on the other these same water-bodies act as deterrents for the locals to commute between nearby places. Although the locals somehow manage this situation by constructing temporary wooden bridges in other seasons but during the monsoon time these same locales of the villages appear as islands arrested by water.

Wooden sanko at Hajichak before implementation copyTHajichak bridge after completion 3 copyhAmarchak bridge after completion

The Gram Panchayat is aware of this situation and is ready to solve the problem. In 2013-14, the Gram Panchayat constructed a bridge with sluice gate on the kolkoli canal. It costed approximately Rs 32 Lacs. But the problem is, such canals are almost everywhere in the GP area. Even if there’s no sluice gate, constructing a concrete foot bridge of dimensions 12 meters in length and 2.1 meter width would cost Rs 18-20 Lacs. Sarishakhola Gram Panchayat did not have so much financial resources to spend on constructing a bridge in every year. In this situation the Nirman Sahayak of the GP came forward with a solution. He suggested using steel in place of concrete for constructing the bridge would substantially minimize the cost of construction. He added that if the project plan got approval he could do it successfully using his prior experience in similar jobs.

Among the projects planned by Sarishakhola Gram Panchayat for implementation from ISGPP’s 2015-16 Block Grant amount, the following two ‘foot bridge’ construction projects were also included – 1) construction of foot bridge at Amarchak sansad at Manapara over Amarchawk canal 2) construction of foot bridge at Mandalpara in Hajichawk gram sansad over kana canal.

The estimated cost for constructing each of the two foot bridges was Rs.7,23,526/-. The first of the two bridges is 12.5 meters in length and 2.1 meters in width and the actual construction cost was Rs. 7,10,283/-. The second footbridge is 11.8 meters in length and 2.1 meters in width. This area is a residing place of 350 families comprising of 2000 people. On one hand construction of these foot bridges will bring relief to the helpless families who were earlier forced to remain confined within their rooms during monsoon, on the other hand the new constructions will help daily commuters to follow the normal route instead of the alternative hectic one. In fact, now these foot bridges have eased communication so much so that even in emergency situations vehicles can travel across the bridges and reach the doorstep of the patients. Such steel made foot bridge is the first of its kind in this block, which is comparatively less expensive but more efficient.